Quantum Fields

Quantum Computing

Quantum computing, which utilizes quantum effects to accelerate certain computations, can be used to build quantum computers. The subject of quantum computing was first established with the aim of breaking encrypted code, so the primary purpose was to compromise data security.

The quantum computer operates on the basis of the use of more than one hundred quantum qubits (> 100 N) in a computational state space with the number of quantum basic states up to N2. The subject of quantum computing was first established with the aim of breaking encrypted code, so the primary purpose was to compromise data security.

A quantum computer must meet the requirements of the Extended Divincenzo Criteria, that is, a device capable of operating on a set of expandable qubits with the following characteristics:

Long enough coherence time for qubits to perform computational operations (including information processing and control up to measurement)
Ability to set qubits to an initial state (Initialization)
Ability to operate logic gates on a set of qubits
Ability to measure final state of qubits
Scalability
Ability to convert static qubits into moving qubits and vice versa for communication
Highly secure data transfer capability (encoded on qubits)
Quantum processors can now be implemented by a number of physical systems. Quantum processors built on such qubits have so far been able to provide many quantum algorithms and protocols.

The development of a large, full-featured quantum computer faces the challenge of scalability, which must integrate a large number of qubits and correct quantum errors. The steadily increasing effort in science labs and large corporations clearly demonstrates that quantum computing on a large scale is very challenging, but at the same time a very valuable goal.
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